Small Talk

Internal interview? Want to meet more of your e team and make a good impression? Then prepare. As the boy scouts say: “always be prepared”. Recently a client of mine was going to have breakfast with the CFO of her very large corporation. She did not know him well but wanted to create a relationship with him and have him keep her in mind when one of his direct reports moved on. We discussed what she needed to know and how she might conduct herself in the meeting. Here is how we broke it down. 1. Learn the issues the senior team is focused on Ideally everyone in the company should know the strategic priorities. She recognized that she needed to bone up on these so she knew them, too. She was thinking in advance what she will say to him. I suggested she read the meeting reports and ask others about him. She had and was going to outline them again for...
Read More

How to Interview with a Younger Boss

Do you wonder if your experience can seem threatening or out of date to younger bosses? Especially when interviewing? There are several ways to position yourself. Consider these points. A recent Forbes article highlighted some real differences between workers of various ages in the way they approach a job. Some probably sound familiar: For example, more workers age 55+ favored face-to-face and phone communication than workers under 35. More workers age 25-34 believed you should be promoted every two or three years if you’re doing a good job. More workers over 55 arrive at work before 8 a.m.; younger workers stay past 5 p.m. If these differences in communication and work style exist on the job, then they’ll also impact who gets the job. Here’s how to handle job interviews with a prospective boss who is younger than you are: Overcome the attitude A young CEO (he'd just turned 32) recently told me that he just assumes an older worker will have difficulty...
Read More

The Pop Up Job

Today, the New York Times reported a story on two professors at Stanford who created a case study of what they called a “flash organization” named True Story. True Story is a card game and mobile app in which players trade stories from their daily lives, resembled that of any company. There was a content division to churn out copy for game cards; graphic designers to devise the logo and the packaging; developers to build the mobile app and the website. There was even a play-testing division to catch potential hiccups. The producer of True Story wasn’t really a firm: The workers were all freelancers who typically had never met and, perhaps more striking, the entire organization existed solely to create the game and then disbanded." Flash organizations are ephemeral setups to execute a single, complex project in ways traditionally associated with corporations, nonprofit groups or governments. Thus those who are recruited are working in a “Pop Up” Job. Each project began with...
Read More