Red Flags That Scream “You Are Wasting Your Time And Talents In This Job!

Many clients seek me out because they hate their boss, their work or feel they are worth much more. They often are right but here is a quick summary of somethings to look for in yourself before you take that leap. And, do not quit unless you have a new job. The exception is verbal or sexual harassment which demands you go to HR immediately and file a complain. Call the police if you have been assaulted. Really! So, let's review other "red flags" to concur you must leave this job: As you look back at 2017 you can't think of one significant thing you've accomplished, learned or brought to fruition at work. You think you are not being paid what you are worth. But how do you know what you are worth? Research with surveys, recruiters and in LinkedIn groups. If you are not, you are worth more, so go. You have talents and gifts you don't get to use in your...
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” I Rarely have the Chance to Do my Job”

“I Rarely Have the Chance to Do My Job” ?  I was intrigued when I first heard this from a client. “Why not?”, I thought, and then I heard the answer: “My boss does my job, her job and several other people’s. She cannot help herself. She has to control to ensure perfection!”   Ah-ha. Got it. So many people fall on one side or the other of micromanaging; dreaded by many and relished by many. It starts as a kid. There are rewards both positive and negative that build micromanagement into a strong muscle that dominates situations. What a challenge for my client and his boss! So, what can he do about this? We talked about several ideas (1) Ask his boss if he is falling short Here is why: As hard as it may seem when you already feel frustrated, there might be an issue for you to recognize in your performance. It can be difficult to communicate with someone who is oblivious about...
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Small Talk

Internal interview? Want to meet more of your e team and make a good impression? Then prepare. As the boy scouts say: “always be prepared”. Recently a client of mine was going to have breakfast with the CFO of her very large corporation. She did not know him well but wanted to create a relationship with him and have him keep her in mind when one of his direct reports moved on. We discussed what she needed to know and how she might conduct herself in the meeting. Here is how we broke it down. 1. Learn the issues the senior team is focused on Ideally everyone in the company should know the strategic priorities. She recognized that she needed to bone up on these so she knew them, too. She was thinking in advance what she will say to him. I suggested she read the meeting reports and ask others about him. She had and was going to outline them again for...
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