” I Rarely have the Chance to Do my Job”

“I Rarely Have the Chance to Do My Job” ?  I was intrigued when I first heard this from a client. “Why not?”, I thought, and then I heard the answer: “My boss does my job, her job and several other people’s. She cannot help herself. She has to control to ensure perfection!”   Ah-ha. Got it. So many people fall on one side or the other of micromanaging; dreaded by many and relished by many. It starts as a kid. There are rewards both positive and negative that build micromanagement into a strong muscle that dominates situations. What a challenge for my client and his boss! So, what can he do about this? We talked about several ideas (1) Ask his boss if he is falling short Here is why: As hard as it may seem when you already feel frustrated, there might be an issue for you to recognize in your performance. It can be difficult to communicate with someone who is oblivious about...
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Small Talk

Internal interview? Want to meet more of your e team and make a good impression? Then prepare. As the boy scouts say: “always be prepared”. Recently a client of mine was going to have breakfast with the CFO of her very large corporation. She did not know him well but wanted to create a relationship with him and have him keep her in mind when one of his direct reports moved on. We discussed what she needed to know and how she might conduct herself in the meeting. Here is how we broke it down. 1. Learn the issues the senior team is focused on Ideally everyone in the company should know the strategic priorities. She recognized that she needed to bone up on these so she knew them, too. She was thinking in advance what she will say to him. I suggested she read the meeting reports and ask others about him. She had and was going to outline them again for...
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How to Interview with a Younger Boss

Do you wonder if your experience can seem threatening or out of date to younger bosses? Especially when interviewing? There are several ways to position yourself. Consider these points. A recent Forbes article highlighted some real differences between workers of various ages in the way they approach a job. Some probably sound familiar: For example, more workers age 55+ favored face-to-face and phone communication than workers under 35. More workers age 25-34 believed you should be promoted every two or three years if you’re doing a good job. More workers over 55 arrive at work before 8 a.m.; younger workers stay past 5 p.m. If these differences in communication and work style exist on the job, then they’ll also impact who gets the job. Here’s how to handle job interviews with a prospective boss who is younger than you are: Overcome the attitude A young CEO (he'd just turned 32) recently told me that he just assumes an older worker will have difficulty...
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